Little River Band to bring its country-tinged rock-pop to Fort Wayne

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Fans of the durable and chart-topping rock-pop band Little River Band will have an opportunity to see the group in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The group is scheduled to play the Foellinger Theater June 22 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $30-40. Tickets and information can be found by clicking here: https://www.visitfortwayne.com/event/little-river-band-foellinger-theatre-summer-concert-series/21197/#

About Little River Band

At some point in every ardent music fan’s life, he or she comes across a band that was presumed to be one thing, and turned out to be another. That is the case with Little River Band. The group’s nonchalant, Nice Guy rock-pop of the late 1970s and early 1980s, sounds American. As in Heartland, or near South kind of American. It has been disturbing (in a fun and not really that disturbing) to find out the band is from Australia. In some respects, it seems I might be one of few people who didn’t know this, but they didn’t seem Australian to me, whatever that means. Well, it means they sounded American, so they couldn’t sound like anything else to me, and I had to triple check sources because I couldn’t believe it. So they are Australian. Little River Band formed in Melbourne in 1975.

And the band has endured, and along the way the members have supplied FM radio with a healthy string of hits between 1977 and 1983. That is the other surprise about Little River Band – – they have so many songs that capture that Nice guy attitude. Hits like “Reminiscing,” “Lonesome Loser,” “The Other Guy,” and “Happy Anniversary,” are all by Little River Band. And that’s just a partial list.

The Best of Little River Band

And it isn’t just the “sound” of the band that makes them a Nice Guy band, it’s their lyrics, too. They don’t seem to be willing to pass themselves off as music’s bad boys, at least not in the songs that made them famous.

For example, from “The Other Guy,” the chorus includes the lines: “The other guy won’t be around to talk to our kids/he won’t understand when you’re down/the way that I did.” It’s kind of sweet, especially for 1983. Which is when the song made it all the way to No. 11. During a time when glam metal was new, as was Music Television, to hear a song that promotes family values without using the phrase is kind of quaint. And, the opening bass line is groovy and lends the song a touch of cool.

“Reminiscing” by Little River Band

The romantic song is the group’s highest-charting single. In 1978, the song made it all the way to No. 3. There is a big city feel found often in songs from the late 1970s. A piano motif sets a jazzy tone and the lyrics relay time spent in the company of a significant other, walking through the park, and reminiscing. The idea is simple, and the piano is accented by guitar, and the entire package was loved by American audiences.

” The Night Owls” by Little River Band

This is probably the least-played of Little River Band songs. It is a bit like The Eagles’ sound blends a little bit with the usual Little River Band swaying guitar and bass. The lyrics tell a street smart, or at least world-weary story of people out at night. The vocal harmonies play a crucial role in the tension-building that happens at the chorus. “The Night Owls” benefits from a driving beat, coupled with the soundscape. In its day, it reached as high as No. 6.

Little River Band’s other hits include “Lonesome Loser” and “Cool Change.” The band released two greatest hits albums in 2014, in addition to their “The Definitive Collection,” from 2002.

It is fitting that the band will  come to the Summit City. Little River Band was a an important part of Fort Wayne radio in the 1970s and 1980s.

 

 

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Dodie Miller-Gould is a native of Fort Wayne, Indiana. She has BA and MA degrees in English from Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne, and an MFA in Fiction from Minnesota State University, Mankato. Her research interests include popular music and culture, 1920s jazz, and blues, confessional poetry, and the rhetoric of fiction. She has presented at numerous conferences in rhetoric and composition, and creative writing. Her creative works have appeared in Tenth Muse, Apostrophe, The Flying Island, Scavenger's Newsletter and elsewhere. She has won university-based awards for creative work and literary criticism.

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