Florida’s new gun law beset by critics across partisan lines

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Florida’s new gun law beset by critics across partisan lines
Florida’s new gun law beset by critics across partisan lines

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) – The political and legal fallout from Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s decision to sign a sweeping gun bill into law in the wake of a school massacre was nearly immediate.

The National Rifle Association filed a lawsuit to stop it and political candidates in both parties criticized it.

Republican U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis, who’s running for Florida governor, went on Fox News late Friday night to criticize the law, which raises the minimum age to buy rifles from 18 to 21 and extends a three-day waiting period for handgun purchases to include long guns and bans bump stocks, which allow guns to mimic fully automatic fire.

Five legislators who plan to run for statewide office voted against the bill as did the chairman of the Republican Party of Florida.

CORRECTS ID OF WOMAN TO GENA HOYER INSTEAD OF JENNIFER MONTALTO – Florida Gov. Rick Scott signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act in the governor’s office at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla., Friday, March 9, 2018. Scott is flanked by victims’ parents Gena Hoyer, left, Ryan Petty, second from left, Andrew Pollack, right, and his son Hunter Pollack, second from right. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)
Parent Andrew Pollack, center left, and his son Hunter Pollack speak to the media outside the governor’s office after the governor signed the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla., Friday, March 9, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)
FILE – In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a device called a “bump stock” is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump administration is proposing banning bump stocks, which allow guns to mimic fully automatic fire and were used in last year’s Las Vegas massacre. The Justice Department’s regulation, announced Saturday, March 10, 2018, would classify the device as a machine gun prohibited under federal law. The move was expected after President Donald Trump ordered officials to work toward a ban after 17 people were killed at a Florida high school. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
In this image taken from a video monitor, Nikolas Cruz, center, a former student accused of opening fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14, appears in magistrate court via video conference from jail on Friday, March 9, 2018, for his initial appearance on attempted murder charges that were added by the grand jury, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (Broward County Court/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
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