School shooting survivors target NRA-linked companies

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School shooting survivors target NRA-linked companies
School shooting survivors target NRA-linked companies

Survivors of a mass shooting at a Florida high school are hoping to expand the reach of their gun control movement by seeking a boycott of companies doing business with the NRA and urging tourists to boycott the Sunshine State.

As the #BoycottNRA movement grew on Twitter, with petitions circulating against companies that offer discounts to NRA members, a growing number of those businesses announced they are cutting or reducing ties with the association.

Both Delta and United said Saturday that they will no longer offer discounted airfares to NRA members to attend their annual meetings, and both have asked the gun rights group to remove any references to their companies from the NRA website. Rental-car company Hertz said it would no longer offer a discount program to NRA members and First National Bank of Omaha, one of the nation’s largest privately held banks, said it will not renew a co-branded Visa credit card it has with the NRA.

In an email Saturday, the NRA called the companies’ actions “a shameful display of political and civic cowardice” and said the loss of corporate discounts and other perks “will neither scare nor distract” NRA members.

“In time, these brands will be replaced by others who recognize that patriotism and determined commitment to Constitutional freedoms are characteristics of a marketplace they very much want to serve,” the NRA statement said.

The State of Florida also was facing some backlash. One of the survivors of the Florida school shooting suggested Saturday on Twitter that tourists stay away from the state. He got an immediate response.

“Let’s make a deal,” tweeted David Hogg, a Stoneman Douglas student who has been a major player in the #neveragain movement. “DO NOT come to Florida for spring break unless gun legislation is passed.”

Wendy Glaab, 60, of Fonthill, Ontario, Canada, was among the first to respond. “I like many Canadians travel to Florida from time to time to escape our winter. I can’t speak for others but I will not be returning until meaningful gun control legislation is in place.”

Glaab told The Associated Press on Saturday that her sister owns property in Fort Lauderdale and she is able to visit any time she chooses.

Members of the NRA have access to special offers from partner companies on its website, ranging from life insurance to wine clubs. But the insurance company MetLife Inc. discontinued its discount program with the NRA on Friday. Symantec Corp., the software company that makes Norton Antivirus technology, did the same. Insurer Chubb Ltd. said it is ending participation in the NRA’s gun-owner insurance program, but it provided notice three months ago. The program that provided coverage for people involved in gun-related incidents or accidents had been under scrutiny by regulators over marketing issues.

Car rental company Enterprise Holdings, which also owns Alamo and National, said it was cutting off discounts for NRA member, as did Hertz.

Other companies, including Wyndham Hotels and Best Western hotels, have let social media users know they are no longer affiliated with the NRA, though they did not make clear when the partnerships ended.

The swiftness of the corporate reaction against the NRA has differed from that of past shootings, including the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre that claimed 26 lives, and the killing of 58 people in Las Vegas last fall, said Bob Spitzer, a political scientist at SUNY Cortland and a scholar on gun politics. Spitzer said the reaction was likely a reaction to the student mobilization that followed the Florida shooting, but he said it was too soon tell how significantly it will sway the country’s wider gun debate.

NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre said this week at the Conservative Political Action Conference that those advocating for stricter gun control are exploiting the Florida shooting.

President Donald Trump has aligned himself with the NRA, suggesting some teachers could be armed so that they could fire on any attacker. However, Trump has also called for raising the minimum age for purchasing semi-automatic rifles, a move the NRA opposes.

In Florida, Gov. Rick Scott announced plans Friday to put more armed guards in schools and to make it harder for young adults and some with mental illness to buy guns. While criticized by some as not going far enough, the measures were significant in a state that hasn’t passed any type of gun control since Republicans took control of state government in 1999.

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Frisaro reported from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Associated Press writers Damian Troise and Alexandra Olson in New York contributed to this report.

FILE- This Feb. 20, 2018 file photo shows Demitri Hoth, right, asking for feedback from Bailey Feuerman, on a letter he is writing to legislators, as they and fellow student from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, ride to Tallahassee, Fla., to talk to legislators about gun control reform. The latest mass shooting at the Florida high school has some pondering the improbable: Could this one actually bring some measure of change? (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
FILE – In this Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018 file photo, student survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are greeted as they arrive at a rally for gun control reform on the steps of the state capitol, in Tallahassee, Fla. Dozens of college and universities are telling students who may face discipline at their high schools for participating in gun control demonstrations to relax: It won’t affect their chances of getting into their schools. Nearly 50 schools including Yale, Dartmouth and UCLA have taken to social media to reassure the students. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
FILE- This Feb. 21, 2018 file photo shows students chanting protest slogans outside the Florida House of Representatives chamber in the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla. The latest mass shooting at the Florida high school has some pondering the improbable: Could this one actually bring some measure of change? (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)
FILE – This Feb. 21, 2018 file photo shows Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Cameron Kasky, left, asking a question to Sen. Marco Rubio during a CNN town hall meeting in Sunrise, Fla. Rubio was put on the defensive by angry students, teachers and parents who are demanding stronger gun-control measures after the shooting rampage that claimed several lives at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The latest mass shooting, at the Florida high school has some pondering the improbable: Could this one actually bring some measure of change? (Michael Laughlin/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
FILE- In this Feb. 15, 2006, file photo, BlackRock headquarters is shown in New York. U.S. companies are taking a closer look at investments, co-branding deals and other ties to the gun industry and its public face, the National Rifle Association, after the latest school massacre. On Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, spokesman Ed Sweeney says Blackrock will be “engaging with weapons manufacturers and distributors to understand their response to recent events.” (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
FILE- In this Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018, file photo, National Rifle Association Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre, speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), at National Harbor, Md. LaPierre said at the conference that those advocating for stricter gun control are exploiting the Florida shooting which killed over a dozen people, mostly high-school students. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
FILE- In this Feb. 15, 2018, file photo, Law enforcement officers block off the entrance to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., a deadly shooting at the school. A large Wall Street money manager wants to engage with major weapons manufacturers about their response to the school massacre in Parkland. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
FILE- In this Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A large Wall Street money manager wants to engage with major weapons manufacturers about their response to the school massacre in Parkland. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
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