Las Vegas gunman’s girlfriend returns to US for questioning

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Las Vegas gunman’s girlfriend returns to US for questioning
Las Vegas gunman’s girlfriend returns to US for questioning

LAS VEGAS (AP) – The Las Vegas gunman’s girlfriend returned to the U.S. overnight after a weekslong trip abroad and was met by investigators seeking to question her for clues to what drove Stephen Paddock to slaughter 59 people from his high-rise hotel suite.

More than two days after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, the question of why someone with no known record of violence or crime would open fire on a country music festival was unanswered.

Paddock’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, 62, who was in the Philippines at the time of the Sunday night shooting, was met by FBI agents at the Los Angeles airport late Tuesday, according to a law enforcement official who wasn’t authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Sheriff Joseph Lombardo, who has called Danley a “person of interest” in the attack, said on Tuesday that “we anticipate some information from her shortly” and that he is “absolutely” confident authorities will find out what set off Paddock.

The 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and retired accountant from Mesquite, Nevada, killed himself as police closed in on his 32nd-floor room at the Mandalay Bay hotel casino.

Whatever his motive, authorities said he planned the murderous attack in great detail, not only stockpiling nearly two dozen guns in his hotel room but setting up cameras in the peephole and on a service cart outside his door, apparently to watch for police coming for him.

During the Sunday night rampage, a hotel security guard who approached the room was shot through the door and wounded in the leg.

“The fact that he had the type of weaponry and amount of weaponry in that room, it was preplanned extensively,” the sheriff said, “and I’m pretty sure he evaluated everything that he did and his actions, which is troublesome.”

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was set to arrive in Las Vegas to meet with public officials, first responders and some of the 527 people injured in the attack. At least 45 patients at two hospitals remained in critical condition.

Paddock had been stockpiling guns since 1982 and bought 33 of them, mostly rifles, over the past year alone, right up until three days before the attack, Jill Snyder, an agent with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, told CBS on Wednesday.

He had rigged 12 semi-automatic rifles with devices that allowed the guns to fire like an automatic weapon, she said. Authorities previously disclosed that he had such “bump stock” devices with him at the hotel.

Snyder said authorities would not have been notified of the rifle purchases but would have been informed if two or more guns were bought at one time.

Paddock transferred $100,000 to the Philippines in the days before the shooting, a U.S. official briefed by law enforcement but not authorized to speak publicly because of the continuing investigation told the AP on condition of anonymity.

Investigators are still trying to trace that money and are also looking into a least a dozen financial reports over the past several weeks that said Paddock gambled more than $10,000 per day, the official said.

Danley’s sisters in Australia said in a TV interview there that they believe she couldn’t have known about Paddock’s murderous plans, and that he must have sent her away so she wouldn’t interfere.

They said Danley is “a good person” who would’ve stopped Paddock had she been there.

“She probably was even (more) shocked than us because she is more closer to him than us,” said one of the sisters, who live near Brisbane.

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Associated Press writer Jim Gomez and Teresa Cerojano in Manila, Philippines; Brian Skoloff, Regina Garcia Cano and Sally Ho in Las Vegas; Brian Melley and Andrew Dalton in Los Angeles; and Sadie Gurman and Tami Abdollah in Washington contributed to this report.

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For complete coverage of the Las Vegas shooting, click here: -https://apnews.com/tag/LasVegasmassshooting.

This undated photo provided by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows Marilou Danley. Danley, 62, returned to the United States from the Philippines on Tuesday night, Oct. 3, 2017, and was met at Los Angeles International Airport by FBI agents, according to a law enforcement official. Authorities are trying to determine why Stephen Paddock, Danley’s boyfriend, killed dozens of people in Las Vegas Oct. 1, in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP, File)
Philippine Bureau of Immigration spokesperson Attorney Ma. Antonette Mangrobang shows the travel records of Marilou Danley in Manila, Philippines on Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. Records showed Danley left the Philippines on Oct. 3. Danley was the girlfriend of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
This undated photo provided by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows Marilou Danley. Girlfriend of the active shooter in the Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, incident, Danley, 62, returned to the United States from the Philippines on Tuesday night and was met at Los Angeles International Airport by FBI agents, according to a law enforcement official. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP)
FILE – In this Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 file photo, drapes billow out of broken windows at the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, following a mass shooting at a music festival in Las Vegas. From two broken-out windows of the resort, Stephen Craig Paddock had an unobstructed view to rain automatic gunfire on the crowd, with few places for them to hide. Sunday night’s bloodbath left dozens of people dead and hundreds wounded. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
FILE – In this Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 file photo, medics treat the wounded as Las Vegas police respond during an active shooter situation on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas. The deadly shooting from a high-rise hotel by Stephen Craig Paddock that killed dozens of people in a packed concert below has forced other cities to examine their tactics for dealing with this kind of nightmare scenario. (Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File)
FILE – In this Dec. 31, 2015 file photo, a New York police officer uses binoculars while keeping watch from a rooftop along Times Square during New Year’s Eve celebrations in New York. A Las Vegas shooting from a high-rise hotel that killed dozens of people in a packed concert below on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, has forced other cities to examine their tactics for dealing with this kind of nightmare scenario. In New York, which hosts Times Square New Year’s Eve and other events surrounded by high-rises, police say they use rooftop snipers to scan for threats, and make security sweeps of nearby hotels. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 27, 2014 file photo, a sniper team stands watch during a visit by the prime minister of India to the National September 11 Memorial, in New York. A Las Vegas shooting from a high-rise hotel that killed dozens of people in a packed concert below on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, has forced other cities to examine their tactics for dealing with this kind of nightmare scenario. In New York, which hosts Times Square New Year’s Eve and other events surrounded by high-rises, police say they use rooftop snipers to scan for threats, and make security sweeps of nearby hotels. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 11, 2011 file photo, Secret Service snipers keep watch from the roof of the Sept. 11 Memorial Museum during the ceremony to mark the 10th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. A Las Vegas shooting from a high-rise hotel that killed dozens of people in a packed concert below on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, has forced other cities to examine their tactics for dealing with this kind of nightmare scenario. In New York, which hosts Times Square New Year’s Eve and other events surrounded by high-rises, police say they use rooftop snipers to scan for threats, and make security sweeps of nearby hotels. (AP Photo/Timothy A. Clary, Pool, File)
A girl places candles at a memorial for victims of the mass shooting Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
A woman places a candle at a memorial for victims of the mass shooting Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
People pause at a memorial set up for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Authorities are trying to determine why Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and retired accountant, killed dozens of people at a country music festival Sunday in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People take photos of the fountain at the Bellagio hotel in front of a memorial for victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
People pause at a memorial set up for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens of people killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
A single rose is left at the door of the Mandalay Bay hotel and casino in Las Vegas, on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens of people killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People pause at a memorial set up for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens of people killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People take photos of the fountain at the Bellagio hotel in front of a memorial for victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
People pause at a memorial set up for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nev., on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with dozens of people killed and hundreds injured, some by gunfire, some during the chaotic escape. (AP Photo/John Locher)
FBI agents walk on the roof of boxes inside the concert grounds where a mass shooting occurred in Las Vegas, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Authorities are trying to determine why Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and retired accountant, killed dozens of people at Route 91 Harvest, a country music festival, Sunday in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Mike Kordich, a firefighter from Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., answers questions from his hospital bed at Sunrise Hospital in Las Vegas, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Kordich was giving a severely injured person CPR when he was hit by a bullet after a gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
An investigator works in the room at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino where a gunman opened fire from on a music festival Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. The gunman killed dozens and injuring hundreds at the festival. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Debris litters a festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay resort and casino Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. Authorities said Stephen Craig Paddock broke windows on the casino and began firing with a cache of weapons, killing dozens and injuring hundreds at a music festival at the grounds. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Kris Delarosby, right, and Colleen Anderson, left, hold Charleen Jochim, center, as they walk towards a hospital in search of information on a missing friend, Steven Berger of Minnesota, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. The parents of Berger, who had been missing after the mass shooting in Las Vegas, say they have been notified on Tuesday afternoon that he was killed in the attack. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
This undated photo provided by Eric Paddock shows his brother, Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock. On Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest Festival killing dozens and wounding hundreds. (Courtesy of Eric Paddock via AP)
The Mandalay Bay resort and casino, right, overlooks an outdoor festival grounds across the street, left, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. Authorities said Stephen Craig Paddock broke the windows on the casino and began firing with a cache of weapons, killing dozens and injuring hundreds at a music festival at the grounds. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Mandalay Bay resort and casino towers over the festival area.
The festival grounds across the street from the Mandalay Bay resort and casino, where a mass shooting occurred, is seen at nighttime Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Las Vegas. Authorities said Stephen Craig Paddock broke windows at the resort and began firing with a cache of weapons Sunday, killing dozens and injuring hundreds at a music festival. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
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