King sets another WR in 50M breaststroke, Kalisz romps in IM

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King sets another WR in 50M breaststroke, Kalisz romps in IM
King sets another WR in 50M breaststroke, Kalisz romps in IM

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) – Lilly King took the breaststroke rubber match with Yulia Efimova – and set another world record for good measure.

Chase Kalisz kept the U.S. firmly on top of the world in the men’s individual medley.

The brash King knocked off her second record of the world championships in Budapest, touching first in the 50-meter breaststroke Sunday.

King eclipsed the mark of 29.48 set by Lithuania’s Ruta Mielutyte at the 2013 worlds in Barcelona.

King added the 50 mark to her record-setting performance in the 100 breast. This was essentially the deciding match of her duel with Efimova, who won the 200 breast while King finished fourth.

Efiomova settled for silver in the 50 at 29.57, while another American, Katie Meili, took the bronze in 29.99.

“I always think Lilly has a world record in her,” Meili said. “Yeah, I knew she was going to go really fast. She’s been incredible this meet. Totally lights on her every time she gets in the pool, so I’m very very proud of her.”

Despite hard feelings between King and Efimova, sparked last summer when King griped that the Russian should not be allowed to compete because of doping violations, the two hugged each other and even appeared to joke around a bit after the race.

Kalisz breezed to victory in the 400 IM, adding to his triumph in the 200. He became the first swimmer at worlds to sweep the event, which encompasses all four strokes, since Ryan Lochte accomplished the feat in 2011.

Kalisz carried on American domination of the IMs that goes back more than two decades, largely because of Michael Phelps – a former training partner – and Lochte.

Neither is in Budapest, of course. Phelps retired again after the Rio Games, while Lochte was not allowed to compete at worlds because of his shenanigans at last summer’s Olympics.

No worries for Team USA.

Kalisz pulled away on the breaststroke leg and cruised to the finish in 4 minutes, 5.90 seconds – nearly 2½ seconds ahead of the silver medalist, Hungary’s David Verraszto. Japan’s Daiya Seto grabbed the bronze.

In the women’s 50 freestyle, Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom got a bit of redemption for her loss to American Simone Manuel in the 100 free.

After setting a world record in the semifinals, Sjostrom completed the furious dash from one end of the pool to the other in 23.69 – just two-hundredths off her mark the previous evening.

Ranomi Kromowidjojo of the Netherlands claimed the silver in 23.85, while Manuel settled for the bronze at 23.97.

Manuel knocked off Sjostrom in the 100 free after the Swede went out far too fast on the opening lap and had nothing left for the return. This time, she didn’t have to come back.

France’s Camille Lacourt took gold in the 50 backstroke with a time of 24.35. The silver went to Japan’s Junya Koga, while American veteran Matt Grevers grabbed the bronze.

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Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/paul%20newberry

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For more AP swimming coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/Swimming

United States’ gold medal winner Lilly King, right, talks to Russia’s Yuliya Efimova, left, after setting a new world record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ Chase Kalisz celebrates after winning the gold medal in the men’s 400-meter individual medley final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
United States’ gold medal winner Lilly King smiles after setting a new world record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ gold medal winner Lilly King, left, and United States’ bronze medal winner Katie Meili leave the pool after King set a new world record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ gold medal winner Lilly King starts when setting a new world record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ Lilly King celebrates after setting a new world record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ gold medal winner Lilly King swims when setting a new world record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ Chase Kalisz competes when winning the gold medal in the men’s 400-meter individual medley final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
United States’ Chase Kalisz celebrates on the podium after winning the gold medal in the men’s 400-meter individual medley final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom celebrates after winning the gold medal in the women’s 50-meter freestyle final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom celebrates after setting a new world record in a women’s 50-meter freestyle semifinal during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Saturday, July 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
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